Who mined the first gold?

The first person or civilization to discover gold are the ancient Egyptians. Gold was mined in Nubia around 2450 BC. C. An Egyptian alchemist named Zosimos was the first to find pure gold (24 centuries before Columbus arrived in the Americas).

Gold was first discovered as bright yellow nuggets. Without a doubt, it was the first metal known to the first hominids. Gold became part of all human cultures. Its brilliance, natural beauty and brilliance, and its great malleability and resistance to tarnishing made it pleasant to work and play with.

Because gold is so dispersed throughout the geological world, its discovery occurred in many different groups in many different locations. And almost everyone who found it was impressed with it, as was the developing culture in which they lived. Gold was the first metal widely known to our species. When thinking about the historical progress of technology, we consider that the development of the iron and copper industry is the greatest contribution to the economic and cultural progress of our species, but gold came first.

Gold is the easiest metal to work with. It is in a practically pure and viable state, while most other metals tend to be found in mineral deposits that make it difficult to melt. The first uses of gold were undoubtedly ornamental, and its brilliance and permanence (it does not corrode or tarnish) linked it to the deities and royalty of primitive civilizations. Gold has always been a powerful thing.

We have long since lost the oldest story of human interaction with gold, but its association with the gods, with immortality and with one's own wealth are common in many cultures around the world. The first civilizations equated gold with the gods and rulers, and gold was sought in its name and dedicated it to its glorification. Humans value gold almost intuitively, equating it with power, beauty and the cultural elite. And since gold is widely distributed around the world, we find this same thought about gold in all ancient and modern civilizations around the world.

Gold, beauty and power have always gone hand in hand. . It was a time when gold was highly valued, but it had not yet become money in and of itself. Rather, it was owned by the powerful and well-connected, or it became objects of worship or was used to decorate sacred places.

The “value” of gold was accepted all over the world. Today, as in ancient times, the intrinsic appeal of gold itself has that universal appeal to humans. But how did gold become a commodity, a unit of measurable value? Gold was money in ancient Greece. The Greeks were mining gold in the Mediterranean and the Middle East regions around 550 BC.

Gold was associated with water (that's logical, since most of it was found in streams), and gold was supposed to be a particularly dense combination of water and sunlight. The Incas referred to gold as the “tears of the sun”. In ancient Egypt, around the time of Seti I (1320 BC, C. Nowadays, in the Turin Museum there is a papyrus and fragments known as the “Carte des mines d'or”.

It represents gold mines, mining neighborhoods, roads leading to mines and gold mountains, etc. Modern thinking is that it portrays the Wadi Fawakhir region, where the El Sid gold mine is located, but the matter is far from being resolved. Jason and the Argonauts searched for the Golden Fleece around 1200 BC. This Greek myth makes more sense when you realize that the fleece you're referring to is sheep's fleece used to recover fine pleasure gold.

The first miners used hydraulic energy to propel golden sand onto the skin of a sheep, which would trap small, but heavy, gold scales. When the fleece had absorbed everything it could hold, this “golden fleece” was hung to dry and, when dry, it was gently tapped so that the gold would fall off and recover. The first use of gold as money occurred around 700 BC. They were simply stamped pieces of a mixture of 63% gold and 27% silver known as “electrum”.

Nowadays, we still talk about the ultra-rich as “rich” like Croesus. At the time of the death of Alexander of Macedon (323 BC). Some of the mines were owned by the state, others were operated privately with a royalty paid to the state. In addition, nomads, such as the Scythians and the Cimmerians, worked in pleasure mines throughout the region.

Both the surviving Greek gold coins and the Scythian jewelry show magnificent art. The Roman Empire promoted the search for gold. The Romans mined gold extensively throughout their empire and greatly promoted the science of gold mining. They hydraulically diverted water streams to the mine and built gates and the first “long wells”.

They were able to exploit the old mines more efficiently and, of course, their main workers were prisoners of war, slaves and convicts. A monetary standard made the world economy possible. The concept of money, (that is,. During the classic period of Greek and Roman rule in the Western world, both gold and silver flowed to India for spices and to China for silk.

At the height of the Empire (A, D. RECEIVE INTERESTING ITEMS %26 SPECIAL OFFERS if you wish In addition to betting on gold, silver, platinum and palladium in the form of coins and ingots, we also buy a wide range of numismatic coins. We have especially strong offers for old American gold coins. Central Avenue, 11th Floor, Phoenix, AZ 85012 Get timely prices and special offers emailed to you every day.

On January 24, 1848, James W. Marshall discovered gold on the property owned by Johann A. As a builder, Marshall was supervising the construction of a sawmill on the American River. During the 19th century, numerous gold fevers in remote regions around the world caused major migrations of miners, such as the California Gold Rush of 1849, the Victoria Gold Rush and the Klondike Gold Rush.

Gold served as the main medium of exchange within the empire and was an important reason for Claudius's Roman invasion of Great Britain in the 1st century AD, although only one Roman gold mine is known in Dolaucothi, in western Wales. The exact date when humans began mining gold is unknown, but some of the oldest known gold artifacts were found in the necropolis of Varna, Bulgaria. Barrick Gold Corporation has one of the largest open pit gold mines in North America located on its Goldstrike mining property in northeastern Nevada. .